Common turkey problems and diseases

Turkeys can be really nice to raise for meat and to keep as a reproducing flock, however, there are a few issues and illnesses you ought to know about as a small time farmer, so you can avoid the heartbreak of losing them all.

Preventing Turkey Diseases

The easiest approach to preventing turkey illnesses is to graze them in natural air and range in a large pen with roosts and to move the turkey house or perches every now and again to a fresh ground so poop doesn’t heap up in one area.

Blackhead is a disease common in chickens can affect turkeys as well. Hence, it is recommended that you don’t begin infant chicks and turkey poults together and that you house mature turkeys and chickens independently. Also, when you make your turkey house, put it in an area where that chickens have not been previously.

There are a few medications you can feed your turkeys to prevent blackhead if it is impossible to keep them away from the chickens.

Coccidiosis

Coccidiosis is an illness that can cause absence of “thrift” or great growth and cause diarrhea in poults. Medicated feed contains drugs that can get rid of coccidiosis. Keeping litter dry is additionally vital, as this parasite spreads and develops in wet, filthy litter. Likewise getting poults out onto field by about two months of age, and moving roosts to new ground as often as possible, will help avert coccidiosis. You can also get vaccination shots for your chick against coccidiosis for a little expense. For this situation, try not to feed them medicated feed as it will deactivate the immunization.

Airsacculitis

This is a respiratory disease that attacks the turkeys’ air sacs. Airsacculitis cannot be treated. The disease, however, can be prevented by purchasing poults from an incubation facility that tests for the disease in their hens and toms. The disease is transmitted via the egg, so the poults get it before they even hatch.

Cannibalism

This may not be classified as a disease but it is very common in turkeys. Giving them enough space for them to graze freely can fix this issue. Additionally, ensure they generally have adequate water and feed. Guarantee that they have enough ventilation if their house is indoors because overheating can also prompt cannibalism.

Predators

Everyone craves a delicious meal of free-range turkey, any day. You’ll see that pretty much every wild critter – and some trained ones, as well – wants to take a swipe at your turkeys. Keeping them safe is quite a task.

Making roost available for your turkeys makes them happy and also discourages predators who cannot climb to get to the birds. In the wild, turkeys perch securely, high in trees. The higher you can make the roosts, the more secure your turkeys will feel.

Ensuring that the fencing around your turkey pen is secure will help stop predators too.

If you are breeding your turkeys in a permanent turkey house, then it is a good idea to run a single strand of electric wire along bottom of the outside of the fence to prevent burrowing from predators.